UFC 119 Mir vs. Cro Cop Trailer

Two of the biggest names in the world will collide at UFC 119 when Frank Mir takes on Mirko Cro Cop in Indianapolis. The winner will be one step closer to a title shot. Mir wants another crack at Brock Lesnar but will have to get by Cro Cop before he can try to avenge his loss at UFC 100.

"Strikeforce: Houston" main-card recap: Feijao, Souza claim gold; Lashley stopped

by John Morgan and Dann Stupp | http://mmajunkie.com
HOUSTON – For two rounds, former Strikeforce light heavyweight champion Muhammed “King Mo” Lawal looked like he could get away with his lackadaisical hand position.

For 10 minutes, Lawal appeared as if he could defend his title even while unable to work the fight to the ground.

 


Then Rafael “Feijao” Cavalcante proved him wrong.

Down two rounds to none after Lawal was just a little faster, just a little crisper, Cavalcante appeared to be fading as time wore on. But the daringly low hands of Lawal finally provided the opening Cavalcante needed. Unable to pull his head back enough to avoid the blow, Lawal tasted a firm right hand on the chin.

Then it all fell apart.

Wobbled by the blow, Lawal returned to his roots and shot in from the outside. But as he had throughout the fight, Cavalcante shucked off the attempt and delivered a powerful knee in the clinch. Lawal staggered back, and Cavalcante refused to let him off the hook.

A wild right hand clipped Lawal’s chin, and the belt holder was flat on his back.

Lawal showed heart in working back to his feet and instinctually looking for the takedown, but Cavalcante simply pinned himself against the cage and delivered a stunning array of elbows to the head. Lawal refused to drop, but his body swayed and rocked, and referee “Big” John McCarthy wisely called off the fight 74 seconds into the third round.

In the end, Lawal ended up with the striking advantage over his opponent with a tally of 139-93, but it was the ones that counted that fell to Cavalcante.

With the win, Cavalcante (10-2 MMA, 2-1 SF) claimed his first-ever world title. Meanwhile, Lawal (7-1 MMA, 2-1 SF) suffered his first-ever career defeat.

With Strikeforce’s vacant middleweight championship on the line, Brazilian submission ace Ronaldo “Jacare” Souza did what he doesn’t do best – strike his way to victory.

Fellow challenger Tim Kennedy provided a stern challenge, and according to CompuStrike, he actually won the striking battle 207-186 over the 25-minute affair. But Souza’s striking total consisted of more clean punches, and he appeared just a step ahead of his opponent throughout the fight.

Kennedy was willing to stay tight in the pocket throughout, but a very tight fight in the opening two rounds started to separate a bit in the third. Kennedy suffered a cut that reddened his face, and with the action close, the damage undeniably colored the action.

Souza slowed as the fight wore on, though he did not appear nearly as fatigued as he did in a May win over Joey Villasenor. Instead, his offense simply slowed, and he allowed Kennedy to stake a claim for the fourth frame by ceasing his offensive moments. But while he was ahead on the cards heading into the final round, the result was anything but certain.

Until it was.

Souza and Kennedy were even again in the final round, but a brief moment of back control on the feet followed by a powerful flurry in the closing seconds left little doubt as to who would claim the belt.

In the end, Souza was awarded the unanimous-decision win with scores of 49-46, 48-47 and 48-47.

Souza (13-2 MMA, 3-0 SF) has now won three-straight fights and is undefeated under the Strikeforce banner. Kennedy (12-3 MMA, 3-1) loses for the first time since 2007.

In lightweight action, former EliteXC champion K.J. Noons turned in one of his most impressive performances of his career, but it was marred by a pair of questionable attacks.

Opponent Jorge Gurgel once again refused to play to his grappling strengths and instead chose to stand and trade throughout the contest – a strategy that did not turn out well.

Noons earn the best of the striking in the opening frame, and Gurgel’s face showed the wear. With blood trickling down Gurgel’s face, Noons unleashed a powerful left hook right at – or perhaps shortly after – the closing bell of the opening round. Gurgel was dropped from the shot, but referee Kerry Hatley ruled that the punch was legal and a dazed Gurgel was fine to carry on.

Noons pounced in the second frame, and another pinpoint combination put Gurgel again on the canvas. But as Noons looked to Hatley to stop the fight (he declined), he unleashed a barrage of strikes destined to end the fight. Unfortunately, one of those appeared to be an illegal knee that grazed Gurgel’s head.

Hatley had seen enough and waved off the fight, even as a protesting Gurgel stumbled to his feet.

Following the win, Noons said it was adrenaline that led him to the wild finish.

“I’ve got the killer instinct, and I wanted to just go in there and finish it,” Noons said.

Following the win – his sixth straight – Noons (10-2 MMA, 2-0 SF) called out everyone from Floyd Mayweather to Nick Diaz. Meanwhile, Gurgel (13-7 MMA, 1-2 SF) once again delivered a crowd-pleasing fight, but he’s won just one time in his past five trips to the cage.

If the comparisons between fellow WWE veterans Bobby Lashley and Brock Lesnar hadn’t stopped before Saturday night, they will certainly cease following the evening’s first televised contest.

The heavily favored Lashley took opponent Chad Griggs to the floor early and often, and he used his collegiate wrestling background to control the action on the floor. But Lashley looked uncomfortable and frantic on top, and he passed on submission attempts in favor of punching from the top. While it was effective in the opening round, it was obvious Lashley was tiring quickly.

As the round closed, Lashley’s face showed the wear of Griggs’ counterattacks as a wide cut just under the left eye bled freely.

In the second round, Lashley put the wound aside and returned to his wrestling base. But even as he advanced to a secure mount position, he showed little desire to finish with a submission – even as multiple opportunities stood in front of him. Lashley’s attack was so anemic from the top that referee Jon Schorle stood the fighters with Lashley in the mount position.

On the restart, Lashley offered a lazy, fatigued shot, and Griggs pushed his head down and unloaded until the end of the frame. Lashley slowly rose to his feet, and as Schorle quizzed the massive American Top Team fighter if he wanted to continue, the former WWE star neglected to answer. It was all Schorle needed to wave off the fight between frames.

Lashley did not protest.

Following the surprise win, Griggs said he realized public opinion was definitely not in his favor.

“I think there was like 15 people here that thought I was going to win,” Griggs said. “Bobby is such an athlete, such a monster.”

With the upset win, Griggs (9-1 MMA, 1-0 SF) has now won four-straight fights overall. The loss for Lashley (5-1 MMA, 1-1 SF) is the first of his career.

For complete coverage of the evening’s preliminary card, see: “Strikeforce: Houston” preliminary-card recap: Cormier rolls; Galvao survives scare

MAIN CARD

  • Rafael “Feijao” Cavalcante def. Muhammed “King Mo” Lawal via TKO (strikes) – Round 3, 1:14
  • Ronaldo “Jacare” Souza def. Tim Kennedy via unanimous decision (49-46, 48-47, 48-47) – for vacant Strikeforce middleweight title
  • K.J. Noons def. Jorge Gurgel via KO (punches) – Round 2, 0:19
  • Chad Griggs def. Bobby Lashley via TKO (strikes) – Round 2, 5:00

PRELIMINARY CARD

  • Daniel Cormier def. Jason Riley via submission (strikes) – Round 1, 1:02
  • Andre Galvao def. Jorge Patino via TKO (strikes) – Round 3, 2:45
  • Vinicius Magalhaes def. Rocky Long via unanimous decision (29-28, 30-27, 30-27)
  • Adam Schindler def. Keir Gooch via submission (rear-naked choke) – Round 1, 1:58
  • Reynaldo Trujillo def. Jose Santibanez via TKO (strikes) – Round 1, 0:28
  • Chad Robichaux def. Humberto DeLeon via split decision (29-28, 28-29, 29-28)
  • Artenas Young def. Chad Cook via unanimous decision (30-27, 29-28, 30-27)

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Freddie Roach sends message to UFC – shows his support for James Toney

8CountNews spoke with Freddie Roach this evening and got his thoughts on a wide array of topics.  First and foremost, Roach takes a few shots at the UFC and makes it clear that it’s NOT MMA Vs. Boxing, due to the simple fact that it’s 100 percent MMA rules.  Roach says that if Couture fought Toney in a strictly boxing match, Toney knocks him out quicker than Couture would ever make Toney tap out.  On the boxing side, Roach informs 8CN that he will be bringing  Julio Cesar Chavez Jr to the Philippines with him to work with Manny Pacquiao.  Check out the entire Podcast with Roach HERE

UFC takes home-court advantage as MMA-Boxing rivalry comes to a head on UFC 118: Couture vs Toney

Video Inside

Source: http://www.examiner.com

As much as Randy Couture’s fight against James Toney at UFC 118 on August 28 isn’t about the sport of mixed martial arts vs. boxing, for most MMA fans, it pretty much is. Sound minds and forward thinkers will easily dismiss that argument, as we all should. A fight may be a fight, but the two are absolutely separate and completely different sports. Toney and Couture might think they are repping for their respective sports when they jump into that octagon, but they aren’t, even if people think they are. Pardon me if I sound a bit confusing right now.

Seems to me that the UFC has a full-on campaign marketing this fight as their stand against boxers who maligned and challenged their legitimacy. There’s almost a sense of over-confidence to a certain extent. Rightfully so, Toney is coming to enemy territory against one of it’s most decorated figures in Couture. Odds-makers have Toney as a 6-1 underdog heavily relying on the MMA fans’ thinking that Toney can’t possibly have enough ground and overall grasp of MMA to defeat a veteran like Couture. For the most part, all people give Toney, figuratively and literally, is a puncher’s chance for an upset victory.

Maybe. We’ll see. But one thing’s for sure. This will be THE EVENT, both boxing and MMA fans will be watching on August 28.

So why is it that boxing and MMA seem to have it out against each other? I’m embedded deep enough in both sport to objectively acknowledge that there is some form of mild animosity and rivalry between both sides. And quite frankly, a lot of it has got to do with ignorance and arrogance.

A lot of the hardcore boxing fans and experts consider MMA as a brutal fad that has captured the Caucasian market ribbing it as ‘NASCAR with 4 0z. gloves’. You got to understand, not since Rocky Marciano has there been a legit White American heavyweight boxing champion, and MMA critics would say this is an outlet for the white athlete to find a place to excel after becoming afterthoughts in sports they used to dominate like boxing, basketball and football. Don’t take my word for it. Bob Arum, who is arguably the biggest promoter in boxing, has called MMA a sport for ‘skin heads’ and ‘red necks’. Veteran boxing writer Michael Marley, whom I consider a good friend, has had his share of vile comments toward the sport.

Marley wrote, prior to UFC 100 last year,

“No, UFC is for the young, the virile, the stupid.

It’s for men who like to see men on top of each other as though they were doing a screen test for gay porno movies.

I’m open-minded. I get a charge out of watching Gina Carano kick butt and take names.

I enjoyed seeing the You Tube videos of Kimbo Slice whupping winos and crackheads in Miami boatyards and back alleys.

But I won’t pay to watch UFC 100 this Saturday night, no way, Don Jose Sulaiman.

You couldn’t pay me $50 to watch it…up the bribe to $100 and we can talk.

The few MMA events I’ve attended, I thought I was at a Ku Klux Klan Youth rally.”

I remember having to respond to Marley’s article defending the sport of MMA and simply dismissing this rivalry and criticism aimed at each other from both sides as a case of comparing apples and oranges.

But that was then. About three weeks ago, I jokingly mentioned UFC 118 to Marley and Toney’s involvement on top of the fact that it was going down in his home state of Massachusetts. To my surprise, Marley responded by asking me how to obtain credentials to cover the UFC event. Maybe Marley figured he’d show up for the simple fact that he could write about it the next day and say it was whack, but this is perhaps a moral victory in itself. The hardcore boxing guy that not too long ago said wouldn’t take money to see a UFC fight live is actually curious and compelled enough to see what it really is about. (Marley will be fine. Last time I checked, the Ku Klux Klan still liked white folks. I should know right? I currently live in the same state Klansmen have their headquarters)

And for that, you have to commend UFC president Dana White’s dynamic, aggressive and innovative promotional ways. He has turned the UFC franchise into ‘must see’ TV even prompting mainstream networks like ESPN to cover it as he continue to expand and promote the sport by constantly branching out to new cities and countries.

In terms of production, promotions and how they cater to their fans, the UFC definitely has been kicking boxing’s rear end in the past couple of years. Having the monopoly of most of the sport’s biggest fighters, the UFC constantly gives it’s fans the match-ups they want as opposed to boxing who can’t even make the one fight everyone has been clamoring for in a long time in Pacquiao vs. Mayweather.

On the other hand, Toney has also been given the cold shoulder by many of MMA’s characters. Recently in an interview with our friend up in Mississippi, the hardworking Brad Cooney, Toney scoffed at the lack of respect coming from people like comedian-turned quasi-MMA expert and UFC TV commentator Joe Rogan who was rolling his eyes on Toney at UFC 117 on TV, and condescending interviews from the likes of MMA reporters like Ariel Helwani. Toney said, “You know what, my thing is this. Joe Rogan’s a b**** (expletive syn. female dog)[…] If they’re not going in the ring, or not going in the cage, tell em to shut the F*** up. Excuse my language. He don’t got a business talking about a sport he never did before.” When his MMA knowledge was put on question by the reporter Helwani who pointed out a ‘side check kick’ term Toney coined in one of his previous interviews, Toney sarcastically responded by saying “I don’t know anything about MMA. Tune-in on August 28 and pay your 59.95 or however much you have to pay for it. Tune in to watch and see how much I know,” and added “I don’t know wrestling, I don’t know Jiu Jitsu, all I know is how to fight.”

Toney may talk a lot of trash, but he is also one of the most intelligent and toughest boxers in it’s history. He didn’t come to the UFC to make a fool of himself. I guarantee you the guy is training his butt of and deserves due respect. You got to give it to the guy for wanting to come into a sport and challenge the best right away. And if the UFC truly belittled him, why didn’t they give him a match-up with someone like Kimbo Slice or a lesser fighter since Toney is just making his debut? In actuality, this match between a former UFC heavyweight champion fighting a rookie, would never be allowed in regulations of boxing match-making. But perhaps UFC wants to send boxing and it’s fans a statement, and so some of it’s ‘expert’ fans and reporters can gloat. Then again, Toney did ask for it, but the last thing I want to see is some non-fighting MMA reporter belittling a future boxing Hall of Famer.

It’s what it is really. For the most part, the feeble-minded are those who love making an issue and comparing boxing from the other. As for myself, I will enjoy this match-up for what it is. An intriguing clash between two tough champions inside the cage. And any real MMA fan knows, that inside the cage, ANYTHING CAN HAPPEN. And as for this whole MMA vs. Boxing rivalry? It’s foolish, since both can be equally admired and respected for the same reasons. Hopefully, regardless of what happens on the 28th, the event would promote better understanding and wash away some of the ignorance.

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Report: Cro Cop in for Antonio Rodrigo Nogueira vs. Frank Mir at UFC 119

source: Matt Erickson | http://www.mmafighting.com

Antonio Rodrigo Nogueira has suffered a training injury that will likely require surgery and has pulled out of his UFC 119 main-event rematch with Frank Mir. Stepping in for the heavyweight will be Mirko “Cro Cop” Filipovic.

The news comes from Fighters Only magazine, citing a source close to the Nogueira camp, and comes just six weeks before the UFC’s Indiana debut.

Nogueira (32-6-1, 3-2 UFC) reportedly suffered a hip injury that will require surgery. Mir (13-5, 11-5 UFC) beat Nogueira when they first met at UFC 92 in December 2008 by knockout.


The UFC had yet to confirm the new main event as of early Sunday evening. Nogueira’s twin brother, Antonio Rogerio Nogueira, meets Ryan Bader in UFC 119’s co-main event.

Filipovic (27-7-2, 4-3 UFC) is coming off a submission win over Pat Barry at UFC 115 in June – his first submission victory in nearly four years. Filipovic, the former Pride Open-Weight Grand Prix champion, is 3-1 since returning to the UFC following a nearly two-year hiatus that saw him go 3-0-1 outside the promotion.

Mir last fought at UFC 111 in March, losing by knockout to Shane Carwin in a No. 1 contender’s fight for the chance to meet heavyweight champion Brock Lesnar. Mir’s last victory came at UFC 107 last December, a submission of Cheick Kongo.

UFC 119 will take place at the Conseco Fieldhouse in downtown Indianapolis on Sept. 25. The main card will air live on pay-per-view with at least two preliminary card fights airing live on Spike TV. The state of Indiana passed legislation to regulate MMA a year ago; that legislation took effect Jan. 1, paving the way for the UFC to make its Indiana debut.

The main card also sees the return of former lightweight champion Sean Sherk, who fights for the first time since UFC 98 when he meets unbeaten Evan Dunham. Indianapolis-based welterweight Chris Lytle rematches with Matt Serra, who beat him in the finale of Season 4 of “The Ultimate Fighter.” And on the Spike prelims, Purdue University product and former NFL lineman Matt Mitrione, whose TKO of Kimbo Slice at UFC 113 effectively packed the bags of the infamous former street fighter, fights in front of his home fans when he meets Joey Beltran in a heavyweight bout. 

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